Distemper in Dogs

Distemper is a virus that can affect dogs and other mammals such as sea lions, raccoons and ferrets. Distemper is highly contagious and can be transmitted through the air when an infected dog coughs or sneezes. The disease is often fatal, so it’s important to understand the symptoms and make sure your pets are vaccinated to prevent this devastating disease.

Distemper is a virus that can cause severe damage to a dog’s health.

Distemper is a virus that can cause severe damage to a dog’s health. Canine distemper is also called “hard pad disease” because it causes the pads on your dog’s feet to become hard.

Distemper attacks the respiratory and gastrointestinal systems and is highly contagious, but can be prevented with a vaccine. It causes symptoms such as fever, vomiting and diarrhea in puppies; coughing, diarrhea and dehydration in adult dogs; anorexia (reduced appetite) or loss of weight in both adults and puppies; runny eyes.

Distemper is a serious, often fatal disease with no cure. A vaccine is the only way to prevent this devastating disease.

Distemper is highly contagious for dogs and cats, and it can also be transmitted to humans who come in contact with infected animals. In fact, distemper can be found throughout the world except Antarctica and certain remote islands. Dogs who get distemper usually develop symptoms within one to two weeks after being exposed to the virus; however, it can take as long as four weeks for symptoms to appear in some dogs.

Puppies are highly susceptible to distemper because their immune systems are not fully developed.

Your puppy’s initial vaccine series will begin at 8 weeks old, with two doses administered four weeks apart. The second dose protects against distemper for one year from the date of its administration. After that, boosters are given every three years for dogs older than 12 months and every two years for puppies between 5 months and 6 years old.

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Pregnant dogs should have their first round of vaccinations given in their very early stages of pregnancy so that they pass immunity onto their offspring while they’re still in utero—this can protect pups born later on who haven’t yet been vaccinated themselves!

Check with your veterinarian immediately if you notice any of these symptoms in your pup.

If you notice any of the symptoms listed above, please call your veterinarian immediately. Do not wait or try to treat your dog at home. Taking your dog to a regular veterinarian will not help them in this case, as they will likely not have the necessary vaccines and medications on hand to treat distemper. Instead, take your dog directly to an emergency vet clinic as soon as possible—this is crucial because waiting until later could result in more serious complications including death.

If you miss a round of shots but still get your shot annually, your pet will be protected against distemper.

The distemper vaccine costs less than $20 and is given twice when the puppy is young then once a year during annual checkups. If you miss a round of shots but still get your shot annually, your pet will be protected against distemper.

The most important thing to remember about vaccinations is that they’re not just for dogs and cats; they’re for humans too! Humans can get distemper from their pets just like animals can get it from humans, so if you have children in school who may come into contact with your pet’s litter box or vomit (which happens all the time), you’ll want to make sure they are vaccinated too.

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Conclusion

To sum it all up, canine distemper is a serious disease that could be fatal to your dog. While there are ways to treat the symptoms, distemper itself has no cure and can lead to complications like encephalitis (brain inflammation). By getting your puppy’s shots on time, you can prevent this devastating illness from ever happening.

The best way for dogs to stay healthy is having their vaccinations when needed as well as annual exams at the vet’s office. If you think your pet may have been exposed to distemper or another virus contact an emergency animal hospital immediately for help!