Dog Pregnancy Care and Information

Congratulations on your new litter of puppies! As a breeder, you know that the mother-to-be will require special care and attention throughout her pregnancy, but you may be wondering just how to help your dam through this exciting time. The following weeks will bring many changes for your female dog—as well as for you. Your dog’s health and diet are vital to her puppies’ health, so make sure that you get plenty of rest yourself as the big day approaches and keep an eye on our canine momma-to-be; she’ll need it!

If you plan to breed your dog, you should make sure that she is in good health and has the right temperament.

Breeding a dog is a big responsibility and should be done only if you have the time, space, and money to care for puppies. If you plan to breed your dog, you should make sure that she is in good health and has the right temperament.

Your veterinarian can help advise you on what tests are necessary for your female dog’s reproductive health before breeding her; some essential tests include checking for hip dysplasia and thyroid disease. He or she will also discuss recommended vaccinations, preventative care (such as deworming), dental care, eye exams and ear checks for any infections or parasites that might affect pregnancy outcomes of either parent or their offspring.

The following lists show some other important things to consider before breeding:

The gestation period for dogs is 63 days or about nine weeks.

The gestation period for dogs is 63 days or about nine weeks. This means that a dog will be pregnant for 9 weeks and 3 days, or 9 weeks and 4 days, etc., depending on when she conceives.

A pregnant dog will need to eat more often because of the growing pups inside of her.

A pregnant dog will need to eat more often because of the growing pups inside of her. A good rule of thumb is that the mother’s diet should be high in protein and fat, but keep in mind that she will also be carrying around an extra two pounds or so for each pup at birth. As such, you may want to slightly increase her caloric intake if she is not eating enough on her own.

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While it is generally recommended that pregnant dogs eat three times a day (breakfast, lunch and dinner), some veterinarians recommend feeding them as much as four times per day during pregnancy to make sure they are getting enough nutrition for themselves and their puppies; however this may not always be easy depending on your dog’s schedule or preferences! 

The weight of your female will increase during pregnancy. At birth, puppies weigh 4-10 per cent of her body weight.

The weight of your female will increase during pregnancy. At birth, puppies weigh 4-10 per cent of her body weight. The average weight gain during pregnancy is 5-8 kg, or approximately 5-7 kg for the first 10 weeks and another 2 kg thereafter.

The size of the litter can vary from one to 18 puppies, with an average size litter being six to eight puppies. Puppies are born blind and deaf, but they get their sight by 3 weeks old and start hearing by 6 weeks old. They also have a full coat of hair at birth (called lanugo), which helps keep them warm until they grow their adult coat at around 8 weeks old.

When your dog’s temperature drops, she is about to give birth.

If your dog’s temperature drops, it may be an indication that she is about to give birth. It’s important to note that this does not mean that you should wait for contractions before calling the vet for help—if the pup’s temperature has dropped, then it’s unlikely that any further intervention will be needed.

However, if you think your dog may have just given birth and are unsure if her placentas have been expelled yet (or whether they’ve passed at all), you should call the vet right away. If she hasn’t had puppies yet but has suddenly lost interest in food or water—or started vomiting—she might have retained her placentas and needs help taking care of them immediately.

Contractions will begin after the temperature drops; these contractions will help expel the placentas and help push the puppies out.

Contractions will begin after the temperature drops; these contractions will help expel the placentas and help push the puppies out.

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Contractions are painful, so you can give your dog ibuprofen or Advil (no more than one tablet per pound of body weight) to relieve her discomfort. If you’re not sure how much to give your dog, consult with your veterinarian or a pharmacist before administering any medications. The puppies are born head first within 15 minutes of their mother’s temperature dropping below 100 degrees Fahrenheit (38 C.).

Pups generally come out head first (this is called “dorsal recumbency”).

While pups generally come out head first (this is called “dorsal recumbency”), if a pup is breech or in an awkward position, it may have to be turned by the vet.

If a pup is breech (coming out butt-first) or a caesarean section is necessary, call your veterinarian right away.

If a pup is breech (coming out butt-first), or if a caesarean section is necessary, call your veterinarian right away.

Breech birth is not common in dogs, but it does happen from time to time. If the pup is breech, it can be born by caesarean section. In some cases where the mother will not accept a puppy who has been delivered by this method, she may chew off its head or paws in order to get rid of it.

You should contact your veterinarian immediately if you think that there might be problems with the delivery of your new dog’s pups. It’s also important to remember that even if everything goes well during labor and delivery, there’s still no guarantee that all pups will survive their first few hours as newborns; some simply die within those first few hours after birth because they’re born too small or weakly developed.

Puppies should be dry and pink within 15 minutes after birth. If they are wet and grayish in colour, stimulate them by rubbing gently with a clean towel until they begin breathing on their own.

Puppies should be dry and pink within 15 minutes after birth. If they are wet and grayish in colour, stimulate them by rubbing gently with a clean towel until they begin breathing on their own.

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Note: Puppies may look blue or gray after being born because of the lack of oxygen in the blood (a condition called hypoxia). This is normal and does not mean that your puppy is in trouble.

After your female gives birth, she will bite off the umbilical cords of each puppy and lick them clean. This stimulates breathing and circulation, as well as helping to bond her with her pups.

After your female gives birth, she will bite off the umbilical cords of each puppy and lick them clean. This stimulates breathing and circulation, as well as helping to bond her with her pups.

If you are concerned about your female’s ability to perform this function, or if she does not perform it at all, you should take care of it yourself by using warm water on a soft cloth and gently wiping each pup clean.

Having puppies may not be as easy as it looks!

The first thing you need to know about having puppies is that they are cute, but they are a lot of work. They will require lots of attention and care, even as young puppies who can’t walk or eat on their own. If you’re not prepared for this level of commitment, don’t have them!

The second thing you should know is that puppies grow up fast—much faster than most people realize! So much so that it might seem like yesterday when your puppy was a newborn and now she’s grown into an adult dog with her own puppy—times two!

Conclusion

While there are always risks involved during your dog’s pregnancy, it is important to remember that the majority of dogs will successfully give birth without any problems. By keeping an eye on your dog and monitoring her health and behavior, you can ensure a safe and healthy pregnancy for both her and her puppies.