Firework Toxicity in Dogs

A lot of us enjoy fireworks because they are pretty to look at and fun to watch. But what’s not fun is when your dog gets into them. Fireworks can be incredibly dangerous for animals. So, before you set those fireworks off this season, read this article about firework toxicity in dogs and make sure you know how to keep your pet safe during the holiday!

Firework toxicity refers to firework-induced poisoning in pets (primarily dogs and cats).

Firework toxicity refers to firework-induced poisoning in pets (primarily dogs and cats). Fireworks can be toxic to people as well, but the risk is much higher for our beloved pets. Fireworks are dangerous for all animals, including other pets and wildlife. The effects of fireworks on plants and the environment are also under investigation.

Firework toxicity can occur during any stage of the fireworks process: manufacturing, storage or transport, handling by distributors or retailers, use by consumers or displays/displays at venues such as parks, sports fields etc.

The primary culprit of toxicity is perchlorate, which is used as an oxidizer in firecrackers.

The primary culprit of toxicity is perchlorate, which is used as an oxidizer in firecrackers. When your dog eats a firework, the perchlorate in it can cause what’s known as goiter, or enlargement of the thyroid gland. Perchlorate can also disrupt the ability of the thyroid gland to produce its hormones (thyroxine and triiodothyronine), and this can lead to vomiting, diarrhea and pale gums.

Perchlorate can disrupt the ability of the thyroid gland to produce its hormones.

Perchlorate is a chemical used in the manufacturing of fireworks. It can also be found in farm fields, contaminated water and even air. If your dog has ingested this substance, there are several health conditions that may develop as a result.

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Perchlorate interferes with the thyroid gland’s ability to produce its hormones. This can lead to hypothyroidism, which causes lethargy and weight gain as well as other health issues such as poor coat quality and weakened immune system function. In some cases, perchlorate poisoning will cause hyperthyroidism (overactive thyroid), which results in extreme restlessness and anxiety for an extended period of time if left untreated

There is no antidote for firework toxicity. If your dog ingests fireworks, get her to a vet immediately.

If your dog has ingested fireworks, do NOT induce vomiting or give your dog anything to eat or drink. Instead, get her to the vet immediately. Inducing vomiting can make the situation more serious by forcing more of the chemicals into your pet’s system.

Vomiting isn’t a good idea because it means that some of the irritants have already been swallowed and they could be dangerous if they’re forced back up again.

It’s also important not to give your pet any medication while you’re waiting for help from a veterinarian. If there is an antidote available (and there may not be), giving it will depend on knowing exactly what substances are involved in the firework ingestion incident so that the right treatment can be prescribed as soon as possible after ingestion occurs.

Symptoms include vomiting, drooling, diarrhea, and pale gums.

If you suspect that your dog has been exposed to fireworks, keep an eye out for the following symptoms:

  • Vomiting and diarrhea. If your dog has eaten a toxic treat or is already suffering from GI issues, it’s possible he’ll begin vomiting or have diarrhea.
  • Drooling and pale gums. This is a sign of severe pain; if you notice it in your pet after he’s been around fireworks, call your vet immediately.
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Other possible symptoms include:

Burning eyes (if they were exposed to flame-related debris) or swollen paws (if they were running through water).

Treatment consists of getting the perchlorate out of the animal’s system and restoring water balance by giving fluids and electrolytes.

Treatment consists of getting the perchlorate out of the animal’s system and restoring water balance by giving fluids and electrolytes. The vet will monitor your dog’s blood to check for perchlorate, then administer medication to help with vomiting and diarrhea. Also, they may prescribe medication that will restore thyroid function (this is necessary because the thyroid gland can be damaged by the percholorate).

Conclusion

Fireworks are dangerous for animals as well as people. Many common pet fireworks, such as sparklers and fountains, burn at temperatures over 1000 degrees Fahrenheit and can cause burns to the skin and eyes.

The loud sounds of fireworks can damage an animal’s hearing, while the flashes can cause severe pain in their eyes.

The high temperature of these devices also puts pets at risk for respiratory problems if they try to catch or eat them; veterinarians have seen cases where animals have been poisoned by eating pieces of leftover firework debris that were left behind on the ground after a display has finished.