How to Tell If Dogs Are Playing or Fighting

Dogs are like children in that playing rough is natural to them. After all, their ancestors were built for survival, and sometimes survival involves some bloodshed. However, dogs have evolved their playtime to include other dogs as well as humans, and it’s usually a good sign when dogs are having fun. But how can you tell if your dog is playing with another dog or actually fighting? We’ve got your back—here’s what you need to know:

Dogs are like children in that playing rough is natural to them.

Dog owners are often surprised, then, when they hear that their dogs have been playing too rough. Dogs are like children in that playing rough is natural to them. They can’t help but try to play with each other in the same way they would play with other dogs or people.

This can be confusing to a newcomer to dog ownership who may not be aware of this fact. It’s important for you as a new dog owner to know what kind of play looks dangerous so you can determine whether your dog needs medical treatment or whether he’ll be fine after some rest (and maybe some ice).

Signs that dogs are playing can include rough physical contact, but there are still limits to a dog’s playtime.

Playing is a great way for dogs to burn off energy, get rid of pent-up stress, and have fun. As play begins, you may see your pup or puplets behaving in an unusual manner. This can include jumping on each other, nipping or biting each other (but not hard enough to draw blood), wrestling with one another, playing tug-of-war with a rope toy or even just chasing one another around the room. However, if these behaviors are too aggressive or if they occur without any contact between the animals involved—meaning that neither dog seems interested in being playful—then this may be more likely indicative of aggression than true playtime.

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The way dogs play depends on their breed and personality.

The way dogs play depends on their breed and personality. Some breeds are more prone to playing roughly than others, so it’s important to know your dog’s breed before assuming that all dogs share the same play behavior.

For example, terriers, hounds and sighthounds often like to chase each other around in circles—behavior they’ve been bred over the centuries to do when hunting small animals. On the other hand, retrievers don’t generally enjoy chasing others as much because they’re used to going after larger prey items like ducks or fish!

Dogs who were raised with more doting owners may be less likely to participate in rough-and-tumble behavior because they’ve been taught that biting is unacceptable. They might prefer playing with toys instead of other dogs or people!

Dogs don’t just know the difference between fighting and playing by instinct. They have to learn it through experience.

Dogs don’t just know the difference between fighting and playing by instinct. They have to learn it through experience.

The first time your puppy sees another dog, he probably tries to play with that dog by biting its tail or body. But if the other dog doesn’t want to play, then your puppy will get hurt from being bitten back. So over time he learns not to play with other dogs unless they look like they’re having fun! This happens even without any training from you—it’s just what puppies do when they’re trying out new things in life for themselves for the first time (and then learning more about those experiences later).

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If you can’t trust a dog around other dogs, you shouldn’t be around dogs at all.

If you’re not sure how to tell whether or not a dog is playing, or if they are in fact playing, here’s how. If you can’t trust a dog around other dogs, you shouldn’t be around dogs at all. Dogs are social creatures and need to be around others of their kind in order to stay healthy mentally and physically. A dog who cannot play with other dogs should not be allowed near children or other pets because he may resort to biting them out of frustration from being unable to express himself through playful interactions with his own species.

If your dog is always being aggressive because it’s playing too roughly, you should consult a veterinarian or specialist.

If you have a rough-and-tumble pup and your dog is always being aggressive because it’s playing too roughly, you should consult a veterinarian or specialist. Signs that your dog is playing too roughly include:

  • Being aggressive with other dogs during playtime
  • Biting at people’s hands or feet when they are holding the leash
  • Grabbing other dogs’ ears and mouths

Dogs who are playing will often pause to show it’s all good fun, but if they don’t stop fighting, that could indicate a problem

In general, dogs will pause to show it’s all good fun. If they don’t stop fighting, that could indicate a problem.

So if you’re unsure whether your dog is playing or not, ask yourself: are they pausing? If so, it probably is playtime. But if they keep going after each other without any sign of stopping, that might be cause for concern—especially if they’re biting one another and growling or barking loudly in the process.

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Conclusion

Dog owners should learn to recognize play fighting from real fighting, and when there is a real problem. It’s important to be able to tell the difference between the two. Sometimes, dogs that have known each other for years can get into a scrap or two over some perceived slight. But if the dogs are close enough friends that they’re obviously still having fun with one another and their relationship isn’t harmed by whatever happened then you shouldn’t worry too much about it either. As long as you keep an eye on your pup while he’s playing with other dogs—and don’t let him get out of control—everything should be just fine!