How to Train Your Dog to Give Kisses

After a long day of work or school, we all want to come home and be greeted by our pets. For dog owners, having your furry friend eagerly awaiting your arrival at the door with kisses and tail wags is the best feeling in the world. Dogs are eager to please their human companions and enjoy giving us kisses, but many of them need help learning the tricks we desire. Fortunately, teaching your dog to give kisses doesn’t require much time or effort—you just need a few yummy treats!

Find your dog’s favorite treat.

Find a treat that your dog loves. If you have a food-motivated dog, this step is easy: just use one of his favorite treats or combine two of them into one super special treat. If your dog isn’t food motivated, try using an intriguing toy or game to get him excited about learning new behaviors.

You can also use something that’s easy for you to get, like a green apple slice (if it’s not too dry) or popsicle stick pieces (if they aren’t too small). It doesn’t matter what kind of treat you choose as long as it’s something that excites him and makes him want to work for it!

Let your dog smell the treat and allow him to lick it.

You need to let your dog smell the treat, but not eat it. This can be accomplished by holding a piece of food in front of his nose and allowing him to slowly lick it. Hold the treat on the flat side of your hand so that he cannot see what you are doing. When he licks at the treat, gently pull your hand away and say “No!”. Repeat this several times until he will no longer try to grab for the food or chew on it as soon as you hold it out for him. Once he has mastered this step and is able to keep his paws off of the treat without any prompting from you, move on to step two.

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As your dog positions himself to lick, move the treat from the front of his face towards his ear.

As your dog positions himself to lick, move the treat from the front of his face towards his ear. Your dog will instinctively follow the treat towards its source and hopefully lick it. As soon as he licks, give him praise (“good boy!”) and a treat.

Repeat this exercise many times until your dog learns that licking is rewarded with treats and praise. You may have to practice when no one is home so that your dog can learn the behavior without distraction from anyone else in the house.

When he licks the treat, give him a verbal cue like “kisses.”

When he licks the treat, give him a verbal cue like “kisses.” Repeat this process until you are sure that your dog has learned to associate licking with the word “kisses.”

Stop giving treats after every kiss and wait for a few kisses in a row before you reward your dog with treats.

You can’t expect your dog to give kisses on command after only a few tries. It takes time and patience, so you should be prepared for a lot of work!

In order to train your dog to give kisses consistently, you need to be patient and consistent. If you are inconsistent with rewarding your dog every time he gives kisses, then he will not learn the behavior as quickly.

If you’re having trouble getting your dog to give kisses consistently, try this trick: instead of giving treats every single time that he does it (like what I did), wait until he has given a few kisses in a row before rewarding him with treats. This way, he’ll be more likely to repeat behaviors that result in rewards!

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With some practice, you will be able to ask your dog for kisses without using a treat as a reward.

You and your dog may have to practice this a few times until the behavior is established, but it will happen. Don’t get discouraged if it doesn’t happen right away.

With patience and practice, you can teach your dog to give kisses on command

Training your dog to give kisses is a fun and easy trick that you can teach your dog. Plus, it’s a great way to show off how smart your pup is! And who doesn’t want more kisses from their furry best friend? The key is to practice this routine over and over again so he eventually learns what you are asking him to do on command.