How to Treat Dry Skin in Dogs

Dry skin can be a frustrating condition to treat, but it’s likely that you can find something successful to address your dog’s dry skin if you and your vet work together!

A bath with a moisturizing shampoo.

To keep your dog’s skin hydrated, you can give him a bath with a moisturizing shampoo. Some shampoos are designed to moisturize the skin, while others are meant to reduce dandruff or treat oily skin. If you’re not sure which one will work best for your dog, ask your veterinarian to recommend one.

Trimming thickened areas of skin.

Thickened areas of skin, also known as hyperkeratosis, are common in dogs with dry skin. They can be found on the backs of the legs and around the tail base. These patches of thickened skin usually have a scaly appearance and can cause irritation to your pup’s coat if he’s constantly licking them.

Thickened skin is often caused by an underlying infection, so it’s important that you treat any bacterial or fungal infections before attempting to trim away this excess tissue.

You should also make sure that your dog has been thoroughly groomed before beginning this process; mats in his fur will make it more difficult to remove large sections of thickened skin without cutting too much off at once.

A diet change.

If your dog’s dry skin is a result of a diet change, it will get better with time. Your vet may suggest that you supplement the diet with supplements to help jumpstart the healing process. A vet can also advise you on how much to feed your dog and what types of food are best for him or her based on their age, breed, and health condition.

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Supplements for dry skin in dogs.

There are some supplements that can help your dog manage dry skin, including vitamins and minerals, omega-3 fatty acids, antioxidants and probiotics. You can also try glucosamine for joint pain.

There are protein supplements that contain collagen and other nutrients to support healthy connective tissue in dogs with dry skin.

Topical treatments such as creams and salves.

Topical treatments are often more effective than oral medications, and they’re also more cost-effective. They can be used in conjunction with topical products or other treatment methods like baths, but they may be used to complement other treatments as well.

Dry skin can be a frustrating condition to treat, but it’s likely that you can find something successful to address your dog’s dry skin if you and your vet work together!

Dry skin is a common problem in dogs, and it can be frustrating to treat. If your dog is dealing with dry skin, it’s likely that you can find something successful to address your dog’s dry skin if you and your vet work together!

Dry Skin can be caused by several factors:

  • Aging: as dogs grow older their coats become thinner and more prone to drying out. This happens for two reasons: firstly, there are less oils produced by the sebaceous glands and secondly those oils become less effective at protecting the skin from water loss.
  • Temperature: colder temperatures lead to increased water loss through respiration (breathing) which makes the air feel drier on our own bodies so we tend to compensate with oilier moisturizers – however this doesn’t work well for our canine friends who don’t have access to such luxuries! To keep them comfortable during winter months consider using woolly sweaters or jackets made especially for pets (available at most pet stores).
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Conclusion

Dry skin can be a frustrating condition, both for you and for your pet. However, with proper care from a veterinarian, there are likely to be many options that can help treat your dog’s symptoms of dry skin. You’ve already taken the first step by reading this article and learning more about this condition—now you can use what you’ve learned here to address the problem!