Intestinal Obstruction in Dogs

If you think your dog has an intestinal obstruction, read this to learn more about the condition and how to get your pet help.

Intestinal obstruction is a serious condition and requires prompt veterinary treatment. Intestinal obstruction is a serious condition that can be life-threatening. It is important to recognize the signs of intestinal obstruction as soon as possible if you think your dog may have this problem, so that you can get him or her to a veterinarian right away. If you suspect that your dog may have an intestinal obstruction, contact your veterinarian immediately – don’t wait!

Small bowel obstruction is the most common type of intestinal obstruction in dogs and is usually caused by foreign bodies (like bones or toys), tumors, adhesions and other mass formations. Large bowel obstructions (colon) are less common than small bowel obstructions but can be life threatening as they can lead to peritonitis and sepsis if not treated quickly.

The most common cause of an intestinal obstruction is the ingestion of foreign materials such as bones, toys, rocks, grass and sticks.

The most common cause of an intestinal obstruction is the ingestion of foreign materials such as bones, toys, rocks, grass and sticks. Foreign materials can get stuck in the stomach or intestines, causing a blockage that prevents food from passing through.

If a dog consumes a foreign object that can’t be passed naturally through the gastrointestinal tract, it can become lodged in the stomach or intestines.

If you suspect your dog has swallowed a foreign object, take him to see the veterinarian immediately. It could be a simple case of intestinal obstruction that can be relieved through medication and time, or it may require surgery.

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If you think your dog has ingested anything that might cause an intestinal obstruction or other problems with digestion (e.g., drywall from construction), take him to see his vet as soon as possible so they can determine whether there’s any damage being done internally before more serious complications arise!

Other causes include volvulus (twisting of the intestines), intussusception (telescoping of one section of the intestine into another), and adhesions (bands of scar tissue in the abdomen).

You may be able to see a bulge at the site of the obstruction. Your dog will have a distended abdomen and may vomit or have diarrhea. He or she may be lethargic, weak and depressed, or having difficulty breathing.

If you think your dog has intestinal obstruction, take him or her to the vet immediately! If left untreated, an intestinal blockage can become worse and cause serious problems such as dehydration, vomiting blood (hematemesis), damage to internal organs such as kidneys and liver failure that can lead to death

A dog with an intestinal obstruction will vomit frequently and have diarrhea.

If you think your dog has an intestinal obstruction, the following symptoms to look for include:

  • Vomiting and diarrhea. These are common side effects of any gastrointestinal problem in dogs.
  • Abdominal pain or bloating. If your dog is experiencing abdominal pain or bloating, they may have some sort of gastrointestinal problem — including obstruction — that needs to be treated quickly.
  • Loss of appetite. If your dog loses interest in eating, check in with a veterinarian right away because this could mean something serious is going on with his body (like an obstruction).
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Conclusion

As we’ve learned, an intestinal obstruction can be life-threatening. If you suspect your dog has ingested a foreign body or may be suffering from an obstruction, contact your veterinarian immediately. Even if you are unable to get to a veterinarian right away, call them and let them know what your dog has eaten and how much.