pomeranian

Pomeranian: Breed Characteristics

The Pomeranian, affectionately known as the Pom, is an intelligent little nugget of a dog. He loves to learn and has a confident personality that makes him well-suited to training. With his foxy face and tiny body, he’s considered a “toy” breed (although he’ll happily disagree with that).

The Pomeranian is a small, friendly, intelligent and eager dog who loves to be in the middle of things.

  • This breed is very lively and fun-loving. They are very alert to their surroundings, but they can still be calm enough for apartment living provided they get plenty of exercise each day.
  • They are good with kids (provided they don’t step on them), other dogs and cats as well as other pets like hamsters or gerbils.
pomeranian

Energetic, playful, and inquisitive, the Pomeranian makes a great companion for an equally active family, preferably one with older (12+) kids.

Energetic, playful, and inquisitive, the Pomeranian makes a great companion for an equally active family, preferably one with older (12+) kids. The breed is not well suited to indoor-only living but does need daily exercise. If you don’t have the time to take your dog on at least two walks per day and lots of playtime in your yard or park, this breed may not be right for you.

Pomeranians are generally good with other pets but they can be aggressive toward other dogs within their own household if they are alone too much or do not receive enough attention from their owners.

Dogs with a low cold tolerance need to live inside in cool climates and should have a jacket or sweater for chilly walks.

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The Pom is not recommended for families with young children because they are small enough that they might be injured by rough play or accidentally stepped on by larger dogs. Additionally, Poms have very little tolerance for heat and should live inside in cool climates year-round; however, don’t worry! They’ll still enjoy going outside on walks!

pomeranian

With proper care, they can live up to 16 years.

Pomeranians are small, typically weighing 3-7 pounds (1-3 kg) and standing 6-8 inches (15-20 cm) tall. They have a life span of 12-16 years in general.

It’s important to keep your Pom well fed, but not overfed, as they can become overweight easily. Similarly, if you’re going on long walks or hikes with your dog, make sure they’re in good shape before you start out; otherwise they may not be able to keep up with you for long without getting tired out!

Pomeranians are long-lived dogs, with a life expectancy of 16 years or more. They’re also prone to some health issues that you should be aware of, including:

  • Brachycephalic syndrome: A condition caused by the shortened muzzle and narrowed nostrils that affects brachycephalic breeds such as Pomeranians.
  • Glaucoma: An eye disease that can cause blindness.
  • Intervertebral disc disease (IVDD): A problem with the disks between the vertebrae of the spine; it may cause paralysis in your pet if not treated properly.

To help prevent these health problems, feed your Pomeranian a high-quality diet designed for her breed’s needs and get her plenty of exercise every day—both will help keep her body healthy and strong for many years to come! She’ll also need regular grooming so she stays clean and healthy on top of being able to breathe freely through her nose comfortably all day long without struggling too much.

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pomeranian

Be sure to give your Pom enough exercise and keep them safe from the cold if you live in a cold climate

  • If you live in a cold climate, make sure to keep your Pom safe from the cold. Pomeranians are small dogs and need to be kept warm.
  • If you live in a warm climate, make sure to keep your Pomeranian cool. Small dogs tend to get overheated easily and shouldn’t be left outside for long periods of time without shade or water.

It’s important that you provide adequate exercise for your puppy so that they don’t become bored or destructive. You should also spend quality time with them so that they can bond well with their family members before starting obedience training classes at around eight weeks old (or older).

Conclusion

Poms are spunky, full of personality and always ready for fun. They are alert to their surroundings and make great watchdogs, but are not really the guard dog type. As long as they know you’re in charge and able to keep them safe from harm, there is no reason why this breed will not get along with people or other pets.

So if your lifestyle calls for an energetic companion that likes to be involved with everything going on around them then we think a Pom just might be perfect for you!