Safety Tips on Pet Poisoning

If you’re a pet owner, you may be interested in keeping your dog or cat safe around common household items that can cause serious harm. Although it’s nearly impossible to keep pets away from certain things, you should at least know what’s risky. Here are some everyday items that can cause serious illness or death in your furry friend:

Fertilizer – Fertilizers can upset a pet’s stomach and cause vomiting, diarrhea, tremors and abnormal heart rhythm.

Fertilizers can upset a pet’s stomach. Fertilizers and other chemicals in the garden can irritate skin, and many have an odor that some animals dislike. Birds may be attracted to fertilizer pellets because of their shiny appearance. If ingested, fertilizers can upset a pet’s stomach and cause vomiting, diarrhea, tremors and abnormal heart rhythm.

Antifreeze – Antifreeze is extremely poisonous and requires the immediate attention of a veterinarian.

Antifreeze is a deadly poison that can cause kidney failure, liver failure and death. Antifreeze contains ethylene glycol, which is poisonous to your pet’s kidneys. If your pet ingests antifreeze, he or she needs immediate veterinary attention.

Rat poison – Rodenticides contain chemicals that stop blood from clotting. Signs of poisoning include bleeding gums, internal bleeding and bruising.

If you think your pet has ingested rat poison, contact your veterinarian immediately. Do not try to induce vomiting unless recommended by a veterinarian.

If your pet is experiencing symptoms of poisoning, take them to the vet immediately. Rat poison contains chemicals that stop blood from clotting. Signs of poisoning include bleeding gums, internal bleeding and bruising.

To prevent rats from eating the poison in the first place, remove food sources for rodents—such as pet food left out overnight—and seal openings where rats can enter houses or yards (e.g., gaps around pipes or holes in walls).

Winter holiday plants – Holly, mistletoe, pine needles and poinsettias can cause vomiting and diarrhea if consumed.

Winter holiday plants – Holly, mistletoe, pine needles and poinsettias can cause vomiting and diarrhea if consumed.

Poinsettias contain a toxic substance called saponin. This can irritate the gastrointestinal tract of pets and make them vomit.

Pine needles are also bad for your pet because they can lead to anemia in dogs and cats if ingested in large amounts.

Holly is another plant that should be avoided during the winter holidays because it’s poisonous to dogs and cats as well as rabbits.

Household cleaners – Bleach, furniture polish, carpet cleaners and other common household cleaning products can be toxic if ingested by pets.

  • Bleach: When ingested by your pet, bleach can cause vomiting, diarrhea and tremors. In extreme cases it can cause abnormal heart rhythm or even internal bleeding.
  • Furniture polish: Just like with bleach, ingesting furniture polish can result in vomiting, diarrhea and tremors as well as bruising of the nose or mouth area.
  • Carpet cleaners/other common household cleaning products: Unfortunately for pets who want to help us clean up around the house, ingesting carpet cleaners can also be toxic if they are swallowed by your fur baby! The same goes for other common household cleaning products such as Pledge®, Windex® and Pine-Sol® which may contain harmful chemicals that could potentially lead to respiratory problems such as asthma attacks among others if swallowed by your pet!

Candy containing Xylitol – Xylitol is an artificial sweetener found in sugar-free sweets like gum, candies and mints. It’s very poisonous to pets.

When it comes to Xylitol, the first thing you should know is that it’s a sugar substitute. While it may have some health benefits for humans, it can cause life-threatening hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) in dogs.

In addition to being found in gum and candy, Xylitol can also be found in many other household products such as toothpaste and nasal sprays. Be sure to check any household product before giving it to your pets.

Make sure your pets do not have access to medications meant for humans or other animals.

You should make sure that your pets do not have access to medications meant for humans or other animals. If you keep medications in the house, make sure they are out of reach of children and pets. If your pet eats medication, seek veterinary help immediately.

Keep these items out of reach at all times

  • Keep medications and other poisonous items out of reach at all times. This can be done by storing them in a locked cabinet, or a high location. Medications should also be stored in their original containers and kept out of sight to prevent accidental ingestion by children, pets (especially dogs), or other household members.
  • Avoid using common household chemicals as poison control products for rodent control. Commonly used rodenticides are highly toxic to people, pets and wildlife when ingested even in small quantities.

Conclusion

As you can see, there are many common household items that can be poisonous to our furry friends. It is important to keep these items out of reach at all times to avoid any possible emergencies. If you have any questions about what a pet can or cannot eat please contact your local veterinarian and they will be happy to help you with any questions you may have.