Sibling Rivalry: What to Do When Dogs Fight Over You

Make sure the dogs are not fighting over resources such as food, water, toys and attention.

It’s important to remember that dogs will fight over resources—like food, water, toys and attention—if they are not trained to share. This is true for dogs of all ages; however it is especially true for puppies who don’t quite understand how the world works yet.

Dogs will also fight over resources if they are not trained to be alone or calm while you’re away. If you have a puppy who gets anxious when left alone (or even if you have an adult dog), this can lead them to engage in destructive behaviors like chewing on furniture or acting out with other dogs in your absence.

If your pup has not been taught how to behave appropriately with other animals, he/she may view another dog as competition for resources such as attention from their human family member(s). This could cause two well-behaved dogs (and their humans) who normally get along great together outside of these situations turn into enemies when brought together inside because they’ve never been exposed before this point where both would get similar amounts of attention at once!

Take both dogs to the vet to make sure there are no medical reasons for aggression.

Take both dogs to the vet to make sure there are no medical reasons for aggression. Make sure both dogs get enough exercise. Dogs that have too much energy can be more aggressive than they would otherwise be because they don’t know how else to release it. Dogs need an outlet for that physical activity, so if there’s not enough space in your house or yard then you should consider hiring a trainer.

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In addition, if either dog is territorial over his territory (like the couch) try moving him away from whatever he’s guarding so everyone feels safe together without any tension between them.

Do not let the dogs see you when you’re feeling stressed or worried about their behavior.

When you’re dealing with a situation like this, it’s important not to let your own anxiety show. Your dogs will pick up on it and become more agitated. Try to stay calm, even if you are feeling anxious or worried about their behavior.

Avoid making eye contact with them and try to stay still so that they don’t feel threatened by your movements. If possible, try to stay in the same room as them so that they can see that you aren’t going anywhere—that way they’ll be more likely to relax.

If things escalate and both dogs start growling or snapping at each other, give one of them a treat (but only when there’s no tension between them) so that he’ll associate good things with being in this stressful situation together. You can also try distracting both dogs with toys or treats for tug-of-war until their attention is focused elsewhere; this may help diffuse some of their aggression toward each other as well as any aggression toward you when there aren’t any distractions around but you’re still around nonetheless.

Do not reward bad dog behavior by giving extra attention, treats or playtime.

  • Do not reward bad dog behavior by giving extra attention, treats or playtime.
  • Do not let the dogs see you when you’re feeling stressed or worried about their behavior.
  • Keep high-traffic areas free from resources that could cause fights.
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Keep high-traffic areas free from resources that could cause fights.

Keep high-traffic areas free from resources that could cause fights.

When dogs are in the same room, they need to have separate toys, beds and food bowls. If you’re having guests over, make sure these resources are kept close enough to your guests that one dog isn’t able to take it away from another. This will avoid an escalation of tension between the dogs as well as protect your belongings from damage by teeth or paws during fights.

If your dogs can’t be separated in these spaces at all times (like if they always have to share a bed), consider putting up baby gates so they can’t get into each other’s space if they start fighting over territory issues like sleeping spots or toys.

Be sure to give each dog a chance to be alone with you in the home.

Be sure to give each dog a chance to be alone with you in the home. This will help them to feel less stressed and more relaxed, which can reduce the likelihood of conflict. When it’s time for you to leave the house, take both dogs out together. If one of your dogs is particularly anxious when you’re gone, consider leaving him/her in a crate while you leave. This will keep him/her safe while also giving them time alone before they start noticing that their sibling is missing (or worse—being left behind).

Conclusion

Remember, dogs are social animals, but they don’t all need to be in the same space at once. Sometimes it’s better if they have separate spaces and identities. These tips will help you keep your dogs from fighting over resources like food, water, toys and attention.