Train Your Puppy to Come

As your puppy enters adolescence, she’ll begin to exert her independence. She may become distracted by other things in the house or yard, like leaves blowing in the wind or the neighbor’s cat. You may be tempted to give up at this point, but keep in mind that it’s very important for you to train your puppy to come when she hears the “come” command without fail. This will help you and your puppy stay safe while playing outdoors or if there’s an emergency situation at home.

It’s important to train a puppy to come when called as soon as possible, without fail, in case there’s an emergency or injury.

It’s important to train your puppy to come when called as soon as possible, without fail, in case there’s an emergency or injury. If you need to go to the vet, for example, you don’t want to have to chase after your puppy unless it’s absolutely necessary.

This is also true if you ever need your dog to come inside from playing outside on a hot day. The same goes if someone rings the doorbell unexpectedly and you don’t want your pup jumping up on them like a friendly hobo who just wants some change so he can go buy more booze—you should be able to call him back inside as quickly and easily as possible.

Get your puppy’s attention before you start training.

There are several ways you can get your puppy’s attention. Some people use the command “look,” others use a whistle, and still others will use a clicker. If you choose to use the clicker method, be sure that your dog understands what it means before moving on to training.

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Pair the “come” command with a treat.

When you say “come,” your puppy should come to you. But what if you want your puppy to come when he’s at a distance? You can teach him that too!

First, do the training in an area where there’s nothing of interest—a park or backyard with trees, grass and no people or other animals around is ideal. Then take something small and easy for him to eat—a dog biscuit or rawhide treat works well—and hold it up above his head as far away from you as possible while saying “come.”

When we stop moving away from our dogs by making them stay where we’re at before calling back ‘come’ instead of us moving all over place trying find them.

Use a gentle leash to train your puppy from a distance.

If your puppy is distracted by something and you want to get his attention, gently tug on the leash while saying “come.” As soon as he looks at you, reward him with praise or even a treat.

If your puppy is already looking at you but has not moved towards you in response to your command, give it another gentle tug and repeat “come.” If after several repetitions of this sequence he still does not come closer to you, try using treats or playtime as rewards instead of verbal praise.

Make sure to use the “come” command in different places and situations.

Once you have taught your puppy to come when called, you can use the command in different places and situations. When training a puppy to come, it’s important to use the command in the house, yard and new places.

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Use “come” when your puppy is distracted by other animals or people.

Use “come” when your puppy is distracted by things like toys or treats.

Praise for coming when called is an important part of training.

As the owner, you need to make sure that your puppy understands that coming when called is an important part of training. When he comes when called, reward him with praise and a pat on the head or tummy. If you are training your puppy to come when called, you should reward him every time he comes even if it wasn’t exactly when you wanted him too.

If your puppy doesn’t listen, try preventing her from getting distracted in the first place by keeping her on a leash and by taking note of what distracts her.

  • If your puppy does not listen to you, try preventing her from getting distracted in the first place by keeping her on a leash and by taking note of what distracts her.
  • Keeping the puppy leashed will help you have control over where she goes, which is especially important if she starts to run away from you.
  • Take note of what distracts your puppy so that you can avoid it during training sessions. Some examples include: other dogs, children playing with toys, loud noises (for example, horns honking or sirens), or people walking by with treats for their dogs.

Put some effort into using the command regularly and consistently.

Once you’ve started using the command regularly and consistently, you’ll start to see results. But don’t stop using the command. Don’t just use it once, then forget about it. Practice makes perfect!

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If your puppy doesn’t respond right away, don’t get discouraged. Your dog isn’t being disobedient; he or she just needs more training in order to learn what “come” means and what behavior is expected of them when they hear this word.

Don’t use the word “come” in a situation where there’s too much distraction for your puppy—this includes things like other animals or children running around; playing with toys; food on plates; loud noises such as music playing or kids yelling nearby (etc.).

Conclusion

Hopefully, these tips will help you train your puppy to come when called. Remember that consistency is key, and that even if your puppy gets distracted or fails to respond at first, she will eventually learn the command. Just keep at it! Also remember that it never hurts to consult with a dog trainer for further advice on training techniques.