What To Do if Your Dog Drools Excessively

If your dog is drooling, it’s probably because he’s spotted a squirrel. But if you think your dog is drooling excessively, there might be something more serious going on. Not all dogs salivate the same amount, but excessive drooling in dogs can indicate a health problem or injury that requires medical attention.

Is the dog’s drooling excessive?

The first step in determining whether your dog is drooling excessively is to look for a baseline. What does normal drooling look like? If you don’t already know, ask someone who has experience with dogs and have them show you what healthy, non-excessive drooling looks like. You’ll know if it’s excessive if their mouth is often wet or if their chin stays dampened with saliva.

The dog is stressed.

Excessive drooling can be a sign that your dog is stressed. Stressful situations can include moving to a new home, having a new baby in the house, adding another dog or cat to the family, or having a new person come into your home (such as an assistant). The same applies if you work: if someone new comes on board at work and that person’s presence stresses out your dog (or any other animal), it will likely result in excessive salivation.

Some of these situations may have been unavoidable and some of them may have been completely avoidable; either way, there are ways you can deal with them effectively so that they do not affect your pup’s physical health or well-being.

The dog is very hot, and making contact with something that’s very cold.

If your dog has been outside in the heat for a long time or has been playing fetch in a humid climate, he’s likely to be drooling excessively. An overheated dog can develop heatstroke, so it’s important to keep your pet cool by offering shade and plenty of water.

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But don’t let the dog drink too much water too quickly—this can lead to gastric bloat, which can cause the stomach (and any other organs nearby) to swell up and press against the diaphragm making it difficult for the animal to breathe properly.

The dog has just come from the vet or groomer. Certain smells can trigger drooling.

In certain cases, the dog may be drooling because it is nervous. If your dog recently went to the vet or groomer, and you notice that they are exhibiting excessive salivation, this could be a sign that they were possibly subjected to stressful situations during their visit. This could include being handled roughly or having their hair cut too short. The smells of the vet’s office can also cause dogs to drool more than usual as well as smelling like other animals who have been there before them such as cats and rabbits.

Motion sickness or an ear infection.

If your dog is shaking its head or scratching its ears, it may have an ear infection. This can cause excessive drooling as well.

If your dog is drooling, it may have motion sickness. If you travel with your pet by car or airplane, try giving him a small amount of apple cider vinegar before the trip to reduce the chances of motion sickness and in turn excessive drooling.

If your dog is vomiting, it may have motion sickness or an ear infection.

The dog smells something delicious. Take a look at what the dogs in your area are eating, and try to determine if anything is out of place or new.

If your dog seems to be drooling because of a strong smell, take a look at what the dogs in your area are eating, and try to determine if anything is out of place or new. If you see something that looks like it’s out of place, it might be time for an inspection!

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Excessive drooling can be a symptom of poisoning by mushrooms, xylitol (an ingredient in some sugar-free foods), ethanol (grapes, raisins and alcohol), or antifreeze (ethylene glycol).

If your dog drools excessively, it could be a sign of poisoning by mushrooms, xylitol (an ingredient in some sugar-free foods), ethanol (grapes and raisins), or antifreeze (ethylene glycol).

Symptoms of mushroom poisoning include excessive salivation and diarrhea. The symptoms are usually mild but can lead to liver failure if left untreated.

Xylitol is an artificial sweetener used in many brands of gum, candies, mints and other products including medicine for humans with diabetes. It has been shown to cause liver injury in dogs who ingest it frequently over time.

Ethanol can cause vomiting, diarrhea, weakness and depression as well as acute kidney failure if consumed too much at once. Some dogs may experience seizures after consuming alcohol due to its depressant effects on the central nervous system – which includes the brain!

Excessive drooling may be a sign of a disease.

If your dog is drooling excessively, it could be a sign of disease. These include:

  • Distemper (rare in adult dogs)
  • Rabies (rare in adult dogs)
  • Nausea from kidney disease or parasites
  • Stomach ulcer (often caused by medications)
  • Liver disease can cause excessive drooling as well. This condition may be accompanied by vomiting and abdominal pain. Your vet will conduct tests to determine if liver disease is the cause of your dog’s drooling problem. Warfarin poisoning, heat stroke, mucous membrane disease, and pancreatitis are other possible causes of excessive saliva production or tear production that requires veterinary care
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If you’re concerned about your dog’s health, call your vet immediately.

If your dog is drooling excessively and you’re concerned about their health, call your vet immediately. If the dog has other symptoms like lethargy, loss of appetite or vomiting that accompany the excessive drooling, it may be a sign of something serious. The sooner you get them to the vet, the better chance they have of getting better.