What to Do if Your Dog Has Anal Gland Problems

Dogs are amazing creatures: they’re loyal, funny, and adorable… except when they’re dealing with an anal gland problem. Then all bets are off! For those of you unfamiliar with the term “anal glands,” these are two little glands located beside your dog’s anus that secrete a smelly fluid that helps him mark his territory. Dogs usually empty their anal glands when they have bowel movements, but sometimes the glands can get impacted or infected. If you suspect your dog has an anal gland problem, keep reading to find out how to get it taken care of.

Dogs’ anal glands usually empty when they have a bowel movement.

Dogs’ anal glands usually empty when they have a bowel movement. The fluid from the glands is released and mixes with fecal matter to form a brown, smelly discharge that you may have noticed around your dog’s anus after he goes to the bathroom.

Some dogs can voluntarily express their anal glands, but others need to be manually expressed by their owners in order for them to get relief. If your dog’s anal gland problem isn’t caused by infection, consider having your vet show you how to do it yourself at home rather than taking him in every time he needs his glands expressed. This will help save money on vet bills while helping him feel better faster!

If a dog’s bowel movements aren’t regular or firm enough, he may not be able to empty his anal glands.

If a dog’s bowel movements aren’t regular or firm enough, he may not be able to empty his anal glands.

While many dogs with anal gland issues have diarrhea, it’s important to note that this isn’t always the case. Dogs with firm stool can also have problems emptying their glands and should be checked by a vet if they start to smell bad around their rear end or after defecating.

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If your pooch is experiencing constipation or diarrhea (or both!), there are some things you can do on your own at home to help him feel better:

  • Offer more fiber in his diet—this will keep his bowels moving regularly so he doesn’t have trouble getting rid of the waste that collects in his anal glands. Foods like pumpkin, bananas and oatmeal are good options for adding fiber into your dog’s diet; just make sure that other essentials like protein aren’t neglected!
  • Feed smaller meals more often—this makes sure your canine companion doesn’t get backed up during mealtime and ensures that he has plenty of opportunities throughout the day to relieve himself healthily when nature calls!

In other dogs, the anal glands empty fine but the ducts between them and the outside of the body become blocked due to deposits of thickened fluid.

There are two types of anal gland problems. In one type, the glands empty fine but the ducts between them and the outside of the body become blocked due to deposits of thickened fluid. This is called impacted anal glands because they have become clogged up with material that has accumulated inside them.

In other dogs, however, it’s not that there’s any blockage at all; instead, in these cases one or both glands simply do not empty properly and therefore do not release their contents onto your dog’s rear end when he poops as it should — this is known as an imperforate anus or rectum (anal canal or rectum).

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One sure sign of impacted glands is if your dog stops sitting for meals because it hurts when pressure is applied to his bottom.

If your dog is not sitting down for meals, it’s a sure sign of pain. If he’s unable to sit comfortably and eat, take him to the vet immediately.

Vets use ultrasounds (a high frequency sound wave) to locate impacted anal glands. Even if your dog doesn’t have any symptoms of an infection yet, if you suspect that his glands are impacted, it’s best to get them checked out right away because they can become infected very quickly.

Another telltale sign is if your dog scoots across the floor on his bottom.

Another telltale sign is if your dog scoots across the floor on his bottom. This movement can be painful, uncomfortable, and even excruciating for your dog. If you notice this behavior, it’s time to take action!

If you notice any of these signs and symptoms in your dog—or even if you just want to make sure that everything is okay—contact a veterinarian immediately.

A dog with an abscess may need antibiotics and surgery as well as medication to help clear up any infection.

A dog with an abscess may need antibiotics and surgery as well as medication to help clear up any infection. Your vet will likely want to perform a physical examination, including an internal one where he or she checks the anal area for swelling and other signs of discomfort. Vets also use X-rays to get a better look at what’s going on inside your pet’s body, so it’s important that you take your dog in for a checkup if you suspect there is something wrong with its glands.

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In some cases, when your dog has an abscess and it’s not infected or in danger of rupturing, your vet might be able to drain the gland manually using a syringe. This procedure can be done in-office without anesthesia or sedation and doesn’t require stitches afterward because there aren’t any wounds involved (the veterinarian simply punctures the gland).

of surgery becomes necessary). If neither method works after multiple attempts over several days then it makes sense for them both together instead.”

Anal gland problems are often chronic, so don’t be surprised if you see them return again and again over time.

You are not alone if you’ve experienced anal gland problems with your dog. Anal glands can cause a variety of issues, from smell to discomfort and pain for your pup. Fortunately, there are ways to help keep your dog’s anal glands healthy and functioning properly.

Some dogs are more prone to having anal gland problems than others; in fact, it’s estimated that up to 1/3 of all dogs experience some sort of issue with their glands as they grow older (and even younger dogs can experience these issues).

Some dogs just seem predisposed to chronic problems with their glands. However, in addition to regular bowel movements, it’s a good idea to ensure that your dog gets plenty of exercise and stays at an ideal weight. Excess body fat can lead to enlarged anal glands and make it harder for them to empty properly.