What to Do If Your Dog Has Eye Problems

Dogs can develop eye problems at any age, but they are most common in older dogs. Canine eye problems can range from mild to severe, from temporary to chronic and from treatable to untreatable. The good news is that most eye issues in dogs are treatable with early intervention.

The best thing to do when you notice your dog is having eye issues is to have him or her checked by a veterinarian.

When you notice your dog is having eye problems, the best thing to do is to have him or her checked by a veterinarian. Your dog may have any number of issues—ranging from simple conjunctivitis (pink eye) to potentially life-threatening cataracts. If your vet diagnoses an issue that requires treatment, he or she will be able to recommend specific steps for keeping your dog comfortable and safe.

If you don’t already have a relationship with a vet, it’s important to find one who can help you and whose office hours match up with yours. You can search online for veterinarians in your area through websites like [vetlocator]. A few things that are important when choosing a vet:

  • Does the clinic offer weekend hours?
  • Is there someone available 24/7?
  • Are they covered by your insurance?
  • Do they perform surgeries on site or refer them elsewhere?

Normal tear production and drainage are important for the health of the eye.

Tear production and drainage are important for the health of the eye. Tears, produced by the lacrimal gland in your dog’s upper eye lid, flow through a tear duct to drain into his nose. The nasolacrimal duct runs from just beneath your dog’s eye down into his nose.

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Normal tear production and drainage are important for a healthy eye as they keep it moist and clean. If there is something wrong with your dog’s tear production or drainage, this can lead to irritation or infection of the cornea (the clear front covering of each eyeball).

The cornea is clear because of its smoothness and avascularity (no blood vessels).

The cornea is the clear part of your dog’s eye. It acts as a window to let light in and focus it onto the retina, which is at the back of the eye. The cornea also keeps other things out—it’s avascular and lacks blood vessels, which means it doesn’t swell or get irritated easily. The outer layer of your dog’s corneas is called epithelium and contains many different types of cells, including ones that produce tears when exposed to irritants or dust particles in the air. This coating helps protect against infections from outside sources as well as disease-causing agents like viruses that enter through tears flowing down from inside eyes (tears drain into nasal cavity).

If your dog’s eye is red, swollen, watering or sensitive to light, it could be an emergency requiring immediate veterinary attention.

If your dog’s eye is red, swollen, watering or sensitive to light, it could be an emergency requiring immediate veterinary attention.

The following is a list of symptoms that may indicate an eye condition requiring immediate veterinary attention:

  • The inside surface of the eyelid looks like it’s red and irritated.
  • The area under the lower lid is swollen and puffy.
  • Your dog’s eyes are watering excessively (more than usual).
  • Your pet can’t see because one or both eyes are swollen shut or partially closed after trauma (like a fight with another animal).
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Your dog’s eye can easily become scratched or cut from debris such as thorns or sharp objects, as well as from exposure to ultraviolet light from the sun. This condition is known as photokeratitis. Scratches on his cornea can also result in a cloudy appearance to his eye and make it difficult for him to see clearly.

If your dog is squinting, red around the eyes or has a cloudy cornea, then he may have an eye problem that requires medical attention.

If your dog is squinting, red around the eyes or has a cloudy cornea, then he may have an eye problem that requires medical attention.

If your dog is squinting and blinking excessively, this could indicate that he has a painful condition called distichiasis in which extra eyelashes grow from abnormal locations on the eyelids. If you notice any of these symptoms in your pet, it’s important to take him to the vet for an exam as soon as possible. The vet will perform a thorough examination of all aspects of both eyes and look for signs of infection such as inflammation or swelling; if there are problems with one or both eyes, they’ll be able to determine whether or not surgery is necessary (or if there’s anything else they can do).

Conclusion

In summary, take care to protect your dog’s eyes from things that could scratch them or get into them. If you think your dog may have an eye injury, contact your veterinarian immediately. Even if the eye doesn’t seem injured, but is red around the edges or has a cloudy cornea, you should still contact your veterinarian to be sure.