What to Do if Your Dog Is Coughing

If your beloved dog is coughing, it can be a scary and worrisome experience. While most coughs are nothing to worry about and will go away on their own in a few days, some can indicate more serious conditions that require veterinary attention. If your dog is coughing, you should take them to see a vet as soon as possible. Your vet can help diagnose the cause of your dog’s cough and recommend treatment options.

Ask your vet about any underlying conditions that might be causing the cough, such as heart disease or lung cancer.

If your dog is coughing, it’s best to visit the vet. The veterinarian can run tests to determine the cause of the cough, such as heart disease or lung cancer. They’ll also check for underlying conditions that may be causing it, like an infection.

The vet will perform a physical exam on your dog and look for signs that something isn’t right with their heart, lungs or throat. They’ll check their weight and temperature as well as checking their eyes, ears, nose and mouth.

If it’s caused by kennel cough, your dog will need to be isolated and treated as needed until they’re better.

If you notice that your dog is coughing, it’s important to know that kennel cough is a common bacterial infection. This can be spread from dog to dog, but it’s also possible for them to catch the disease on their own. The good news is that many dogs recover from kennel cough within a few weeks with no complications; however, if your pup has severe symptoms or has been infected since long ago (or if they have been exposed to other dogs with kennel cough), they may need antibiotics in order to recover completely and stop coughing up phlegm.

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This type of infection is not the same as canine influenza (CIV), which is an entirely different disease caused by another virus than what causes this type of infection. CIV often requires antibiotic treatment and hospitalization; so if you think your pet might have caught it instead of just a simple case of kennel cough, contact your vet immediately for more information.

If it’s caused by heartworm, your dog will need to be treated with an antiparasitic medicine.

Older dogs may get tired or experience coughing after exercise, while younger dogs may show no signs of illness at all.

Heartworm is transmitted by mosquitoes, which means that if you live in an area with a lot of insects or travel to places where you’ll have more exposure to them (such as the beach), it’s important to talk with your vet about whether or not your dog needs to be on heartworm medication.

Symptoms of heartworm include coughing, fatigue and labored breathing. While older dogs may show no signs of illness after being infected with heartworms (which can occur when larvae in mosquitoes enter their bloodstreams), younger dogs may experience coughing and/or difficulty breathing after exercise or excitement.

The main danger with distemper is that it can cause permanent brain damage in some dogs once they’ve recovered from the illness.

The main danger with distemper is that it can cause permanent brain damage in some dogs once they’ve recovered from the illness. In fact, it’s fatal in about 20% of cases.

Fortunately, distemper is preventable by vaccination. Your veterinarian will be able to test your dog for this disease, as well as other diseases that affect puppies such as kennel cough and parvo virus (more on these later).

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If your dog is coughing, you should take them to see a vet as soon as possible.

If your dog is coughing, you should take them to see a vet as soon as possible. If your dog has had a cough for more than two weeks, or if the cough gets worse and continues for longer than a week, then it’s most likely that they have an underlying condition. Your vet will be able to diagnose the condition, and depending on what it is they might be able to recommend treatment options.

If your dog is diagnosed with kennel cough (a highly contagious respiratory infection caused by Bordetella bronchiseptica), you’ll need to isolate them from other dogs until their symptoms have cleared up completely.

Conclusion

If your dog is coughing, you should take them to see a vet as soon as possible. The most common causes of canine coughing are kennel cough and heartworm, but there are also many other serious illnesses that can cause it. Your vet will be able to diagnose what’s causing your dog’s cough and provide the appropriate treatment for it.