Why Does My Dog Smell Like Fish After Swimming

Your dog may smell musty if he frequently swims in bodies of water. The odor is caused by bacteria present in the water as well as on his skin and hair. This bacteria produces a byproduct called 2-aminoisobutyric acid, or 2-AIB, which can also be found in peach and pear skins. Peach and pear skins have a sweet scent that most people are familiar with, but it may come across as unpleasant to those who aren’t used to it—especially when mixed with the smell of wet dog!

If you notice that your canine companion smells musty after spending time swimming or playing near water sources (ponds, lakes, rivers), it’s likely due to this phenomenon (or perhaps another cause). Some dogs’ coats are also more prone than others’ to absorbing scents from their surroundings; therefore, one could develop an odd odor even without being exposed directly to anything unusual for long periods of time.

Dogs who swim in a pool or lake may develop a musty odor, even if they’re out of the water.

Dogs who swim in a pool or lake may develop a musty odor, even if they’re out of the water. While this icky smell isn’t harmful to your dog, it can be annoying for you and others around you. Fortunately, there’s an easy fix for this problem: just give them a bath!

The cause of this odor is bacteria called Pseudomonas aeruginosa that lives on your pet’s skin. When exposed to water and air (such as when swimming), the bacteria releases 2-aminoisobutyric acid (2AIB) into their bodies—and that’s what gives them their bad smell. The good news is that 2AIB has no negative effects on dogs’ health at all; it simply smells bad because humans are much more sensitive than canines when it comes to smelling things like this one.

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The culprit is thought to be a type of bacteria that produces a byproduct called 2-aminoisobutyric acid, which is also found in peach and pear skins and gives them their scent.

The culprit is thought to be a type of bacteria that produces a byproduct called 2-aminoisobutyric acid, which is also found in peach and pear skins and gives them their scent.

This chemical is a strong source of odor for two reasons: it’s produced by anaerobic bacteria (bacteria that live without oxygen), and it doesn’t break down easily like other organic materials do when exposed to sunlight or air. The result? Your wet dog smells like he’s covered in peaches!

Dogs who swim in ponds or lakes seem more susceptible to the odor than dogs who swim in chlorinated pools.

Dogs who swim in ponds or lakes seem more susceptible to the odor than dogs who swim in chlorinated pools. This is because natural environments tend to have a higher concentration of naturally occurring bacteria and fungi, which can lead to an unpleasant smell on your pup’s fur.

While chlorine kills most of these germs, it doesn’t do so as effectively as swimming pools—and some studies have shown that certain kinds of bacteria and fungi can actually be beneficial for dogs’ skin health! So go ahead and take your dog for a swim at the lake this weekend; not only will you be providing them with exercise but also helping them stay healthy too!

The smell can be neutralized using something like apple cider vinegar.

Apple cider vinegar is a great tool to help neutralize the smell of musty dog skin. Apple cider vinegar has antibacterial properties, so if you apply it to your dog’s coat, it will help kill off any bacteria that may be causing the stink. If you’re looking for an all-natural way to reduce the odor in your dog’s coat, try adding some apple cider vinegar!

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When treating your pet with apple cider vinegar, there are several different methods you can use:

  • When bathing your dog, add 1-3 tablespoons of apple cider vinegar into their shampoo or conditioner. This will help keep their skin clean and smelling fresh without overloading them with chemicals found in commercial products.
  • Pour some on dry fur after grooming or bathing them with water alone; this helps make sure that no loose hair gets stuck underneath where you don’t want it (like between toes).

So the next time you notice your dog with a musty odor, try to relax. It’s not going to last forever, and in the meantime, it’s not harming them. After all, we love our dogs exactly as they are—even when they smell like wet lawn mowers!